Tag Archives: Debugging

Articles related to Microsoft SQL Server debugging

SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 Installation Error: 0x80072f76

#0411 – SQL Server – SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 – Installation failed with error 0x80072f76: Failed to acquire payload


I was recently building up an all-in-one development environment for a project and ran into an unexpected error. I had already installed Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 and attempted to install SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT).

The SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 failed to install with the following error.

SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 Installation Error: 0x80072f76

SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 Installation Error: 0x80072f76

Upon studying the error log file, I found the following sequence of unexpected entries:

Acquiring package: Microsoft.DataTools.AnalysisServices, payload: pay98911873C1CF2F7FF48824555D2B0337, download from: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=866936
Error 0x80072f08: Failed to send request to URL: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=866936, trying to process HTTP status code anyway.
Error 0x80072f76: Failed attempt to download URL: 'https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=866936' to: 'C:\Users\sqltwins\AppData\Local\Temp\2\{5C5CD709-A276-454C-88E3-0E939CB80B0E}\pay98911873C1CF2F7FF48824555D2B0337'
Error 0x80072f76: Failed to acquire payload from: 'https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=866936' to working path: 'C:\Users\sqltwins\AppData\Local\Temp\2\{5C5CD709-A276-454C-88E3-0E939CB80B0E}\pay98911873C1CF2F7FF48824555D2B0337'
Failed to acquire payload: pay98911873C1CF2F7FF48824555D2B0337 to working path: C:\Users\sqltwins\AppData\Local\Temp\2\{5C5CD709-A276-454C-88E3-0E939CB80B0E}\pay98911873C1CF2F7FF48824555D2B0337, error: 0x80072f76.
MainViewModel.OnPackageAction: Install CompletedDownload for package SQL Server Analysis Services (id: Microsoft.DataTools.AnalysisServices)
Error 0x80072f76: Failed while caching, aborting execution.

From the error log entries, it is clear that the installer program was unable to access a particular URL in order to download the respective installer components.

So, I took the URL “https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=866936”, pasted it in the address bar of a browser and immediately ran into a problem:

Your current security settings do not allow this file to be downloaded.
Enhanced Security Configuration (ESC) preventing file downloads

Enhanced Security Configuration (ESC) preventing file downloads

This clearly indicates that the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration (IE-ESC) was preventing the download and in-turn resulting into the error.

Solution

I immediately added microsoft.com to the “trusted sites” zone and restarted the installer. This time, the installer completed successfully! (One may suggest to disable Enhaned Security Configuration altogether, but that is not recommended due to the obvious security reasons.)

SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 Installation continues after necessary package URLs are allowed in Enhanced Security Configuration

SSDT 15.5.2 for Visual Studio 2017 Installation

Hope this helps you someday when you are setting up your environments.

References

  • Download SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT): https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/ssdt/download-sql-server-data-tools-ssdt
  • Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration (ESC): https://support.microsoft.com/en-in/help/815141/internet-explorer-enhanced-security-configuration-changes-the-browsing

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

#0399 – SQL Server – SSIS – Debugging – Exploring the Data Viewer


I often get questions regarding debugging of SSIS packages with the most common scenario being a need to “see” the data flowing  down the data pipeline. SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) packages are explored and edited visually within the SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) and hence, the mechanism to troubleshoot an SSIS package when developing it also has to be visual.

The Data Viewer allows a developer to pause the data flow in a data flow task and look at the data as it is on that point in the pipeline. Today, I will introduce you to the Data Viewer.

Sample SSIS package to demonstrate Data Viewer on the Data Flow Pipeline

Sample SSIS package to demonstrate Data Viewer on the Data Flow Pipeline

The data flow is quite simply taking all the records from the [HumanResources].[Employee] table of the sample [AdventureWorks2014] database and putting into an object variable via the Recordset destination (I am using the Recordset destination for the demo here for the sake of simplicity).

Using the Data Viewer

If I want to study the data flowing through the data pipeline, all I need to do is right-click on the data flow path and choose “Enable Data Viewer” (a data flow path being the connection between a source and a transformation, between two transformations or a transformation and a destination).

0399_image2

Enabling the Data Viewer on a Data Flow Pipeline

0399_image3

Magnifying glass indicates Data Viewer is enabled

As can be seen from the screen grab above, a magnifying glass icon on the data flow now appears indicating that the data flow is configured for viewing.

If I execute the SSIS package at this point, I see that the data flow pauses just before it starts writing to the destination and opens a new grid window. The window resembles a normal dataset viewer (if you are familiar with developing C# or ASP.NET applications in Visual Studio, you would feel right at home!) which contains the data flowing through the data pipeline. You can even copy this grid to Excel or any other file for further research (Tip!).

Data Viewer showing data flowing through the data path

Data Viewer showing data flowing through the data path

Once you have studied the data flowing through, you can choose to either stop the transaction (by stopping execution of the package) or allowing the package to execute through by clicking on the “green” arrow on the data viewer.

Allowing the data flow to continue down the pipeline by allowing the package to resume execution

Allowing the data flow to continue down the pipeline by allowing the package to resume execution

Filtering columns displayed on the Data Viewer

Sometimes, we may not want to sift through all the columns in the data pipeline. If we know that a particular column is causing some problems, we may just want to monitor that column. One can explicitly choose which columns should be displayed on the data viewer by going into the data flow properties.

  1. Right-click on the data flow path and choose “Edit”
  2. Go to “Data Viewer”
  3. Use the arrow buttons to selectively choose which columns to display in the data viewer
Selectively choosing columns visible on the Data Viewer

Selectively choosing columns visible on the Data Viewer

Summary

The Data Viewer can be used for design time troubleshooting of an SSIS package, allowing developers to pause the data flow and monitor the data flowing down the data pipeline.

  • You can have multiple data viewers in your data flow task so that you can monitor each part of the data flow
  • You can control the columns seen in the data viewer so that you can focus on the fields of interest
  • You can copy this data for further research/maintaining a record
  • If you have transformation components that use 64-bit components, you may need to turn off the “Run64BitRuntime” under the Debug options (Debug -> Solution Properties -> Configuration Properties -> Debugging)

Further Reading

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

#0396 – SQL Server – SSIS – Move and rename a file – “Could not find part of the path.” File System Task error


When working with disconnected sources or remote systems in SSIS, source data is often received in the form of files. A common requirement is to rename the file once the data import/processing is completed.

I looked at the File System task in my previous post. The file system task appears to be the best way to implement this requirement. However, we run into something that is unexpected:

The “Move File” operation moves a file from one folder to another. It does not rename the file.

Basic Scenario

Let me leverage the same example as I had in my previous post. I have a set of files in a folder and an SSIS package that is configured to rename the files.

Folder with input files which need to be renamed once processing is complete

Folder with input files which need to be renamed once processing is complete

The destination file name comes from an expression that uses basic string concatenation to achieve the required target file name. The expression used in the destination file name variable is provided below.

@[User::SourceFolder] + 
SUBSTRING(@[User::FileName], 1, FINDSTRING(@[User::FileName],".",1) -1 ) + (DT_WSTR,4)YEAR(GETDATE()) + (DT_WSTR,2)MONTH(GETDATE()) + (DT_WSTR,2)DAY(GETDATE()) + 
SUBSTRING(@[User::FileName], FINDSTRING(@[User::FileName],".",1), LEN(@[User::FileName]))
Variable to populate the new name for the output file using an Expression

Variable to populate the new name for the output file using an Expression

Move File Operation

The File System Task in this package has been designed to use variables as the source and destination file names. The File System task is configured to perform a “Move File” operation.

0396-sqltwins-filesystemtask-configured-for-move-file-operation

File System Task in the “Move File” configuration

Upon running the SSIS package, no files are processed and we run into an error.

0396-sqltwins-filesystemtask-move-file-configuration-error

Execution Error when running the File System Task

0396-sqltwins-filesystemtask-move-file-configuration-error-details

“Could not find a part of the path.” error in the File System task “Move File” configuration

Looking at the error in detail, we see that the error is:

Could not find a part of the path.

Using the Rename File configuration

If we change the operation type to the “Rename File” configuration, we can see that the movement is successful.

File System Task configuration using

File System Task configuration using “Rename File” mode where input & output file names are supplied via variables

0396-sqltwins-result-of-renamefile-configuration

Moving files using File System task with “Rename File” operation

Behind the scenes

So, why is the File System task not behaving as expected? If the File System configuration is set to “Move File”, why did the files not move to the target folder?

The reason is quite simple: “Move File” only moves a file – it cannot rename a file during the movement of the file.

In  short, one has to configure the File System task in a “Rename File” configuration if a file has to be renamed – irrespective of whether the rename is in-place or in a different folder.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

#0388 – SQL Server – SSIS – Lookup transformations are case-sensitive


I have been working with SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) recently. In many ways, SSIS is counter-intuitive if you have been working with the database engine for long (more than a decade in my case). Working with SSIS is more like working with any other .net framework based programming language (C# or VB.net). Over the next couple of days, I will be writing about some of the salient aspects of SSIS which should be kept in mind in case you are working on multiple SQL Server technologies.

Lookup Transformations – A key to successful system integrations

Cross-referencing of Enumerations

One of the key challenges for any system integration is to ensure that the enumerations  and “default” values used in the source system (e.g. sales statuses, product categories, etc) align between the “source” & “target” systems.

Once the values aligned during business, high-level and low-level designs, implementation of this cross-referencing in SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) is done by a data flow component called the “Lookup Transformation“. The Lookup transformation effectively performs a join between the input data with a reference data set. If values match, they are available in what is called the “Match Output” whereas values that do not match can be made available as a “No Match Output”. However, this comes with a tiny counter-intuitive behaviour that I learnt about the hard way.

The lookup performed by the lookup transformation is case-sensitive.

Demo

In order to demonstrate the case-sensitivity of lookup transformations, I have developed a SSIS package that does the following in a simple data-flow task:

  1. Get some static data from an OLEDB data source, basically some rows with text representation of numbers (One, Two, Three, and so on)
  2. The Lookup transform has a static mapping between the numeric and text values of various numbers – 1 through 10
  3. As the input data passes through the lookup transformation, we try to map the text values in the source data with the values available in the lookup transformation so that we can get the appropriate numeric representation
    • In my demo, records that find a valid lookup are written to a recordset destination (it could be any valid destination), whereas records that do not match are written to another destination
    • I have placed data viewers on the output pipelines to visually see the data being moved, which is what I will show below

The query used to generate the static data in the OLE DB source is provided below.

SELECT srcValues.RowName,
       srcValues.RowValue
FROM (VALUES ('Row1','One'),
             ('Row2','Two'),
             ('Row3','three'),
             ('Row4','Four'),
             ('Row5','Five'),
             ('Row6','Six'),
             ('Row7','seven'),
             ('Row8','eight'),
             ('Row9','Nine'),
             ('Row10','Ten')
     ) AS srcValues (RowName, RowValue);

The query used to generate the lookup values for the lookup transform is provided below:

SELECT lookUpValues.Id,
       lookUpValues.RowValue
FROM (VALUES (1, 'One'),
             (2, 'Two'),
             (3, 'Three'),
             (4, 'Four'),
             (5, 'Five'),
             (6, 'Six'),
             (7, 'Seven'),
             (8, 'Eight'),
             (9, 'Nine'),
             (10, 'Ten')
     ) AS lookUpValues (Id, RowValue);

Observe that in the static source data, not all values have a consistent case – some are in sentence case, whereas some are in small case.

The screenshots below show the overall setup of the SSIS package.

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

LookUp Transformation - General configuration (Notice redirection to no match output)

LookUp Transformation – General configuration (Notice redirection to no match output)

Lookup Transformation - Connection tab showing reference values

Lookup Transformation – Connection tab showing reference values

Lookup Transformation - Columns configuration showing "RowValue" used for matching whereas the reference Id is fetched to include in output

Lookup Transformation – Columns configuration

Notice here that we have used the text value from the source data (“RowValue” column) for matching/lookup to the reference data set. The reference Id is fetched to include in output.

If a match is found the “Match Output” should contain the matching row from the source combined with the Id from the reference/lookup data. This is seen in the data viewer output below.

Lookup Transformation - Match Output (source rows with the Id from the reference data)

Lookup Transformation – Match Output (source rows with the Id from the reference data)

If a match is not found (which would be the case for the values with lower case in the source data), the “No Match Output” will contain the row from the source data that failed the lookup (since failures were redirected to the “No Match” output in the general configuration). Notice we do not get the Id from the reference because no match to the reference was found.

Lookup Transformation - No Match Output

Lookup Transformation – No Match Output

Summary

When working with a case insensitive database, we often tend to take data quality with respect to case of the data for granted. Having data with inconsistent case has multiple repercussions (especially with data grouping in front end applications), but the biggest negative impact due to inconsistent case of text data is the inaccurate cross-referencing during a master data cleanup, system integration or data migration exercise.

Call to action

Do take a few cycles in your development to take a look at your data quality, and if necessary, implement required data cleansing to ensure that your lookup data, enumerations and master data are using a case that is correct and consistent with the domain and business requirements.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

"Default Cursor" scope set at the database level can be verified using the "Options" page of the "Database Properties" window in SSMS

#0386 – SQL Server – Cursor Scope – A cursor with the name ‘cursor name’ does not exist.; Msg 16916


It’s a well-known fact that using T-SQL cursors have a significant overhead on the query performance. At the same time, there are applications where one simply cannot use a set-based approach and use T-SQL cursors. Examples of such scenarios are when cascading complex calculations need to happen for each record (which are handled via CLR code or dedicated stored procedures) or when interfacing applications can only accept one record at a time.

Each T-SQL cursor has a specific scope. The cursor can be limited for use within the given stored procedure, trigger or batch making it a LOCAL cursor. If the context of the cursor is to be made available to multiple objects and scopes within the connection until explicitly deallocated, it is a GLOBAL cursor.

The cursor scope (GLOBAL/LOCAL) can be defined at the database level and can be overridden by the DECLARE CURSOR statement. Most implementations that I have seen rely on the database configuration. In such cases, if the cursor has been designed for GLOBAL access and someone changes the database configuration to a LOCAL cursor scope, the code will break.

Checking Default Cursor Scope: Database Configuration

Using T-SQL

A simple check on the [is_local_cursor_default] column of the [sys].[databases] will tell us if the default cursor scope is local or global.

--Confirm that Global cursors are set:
--        is_local_cursor_default = 0, i.e. GLOBAL cursor scope
--        is_local_cursor_default = 1, i.e. LOCAL cursor scope
--This is the default setting!
SELECT [sd].[is_local_cursor_default],
       [sd].* 
FROM [sys].[databases] AS sd 
WHERE [sd].[database_id] = DB_ID('AdventureWorks2012');
GO

As the column name suggests, a value of 0 indicates that the cursor is GLOBAL, whereas a value of 1 indicates that the cursor is LOCAL.

Using SSMS

In SSMS, we can check the value of default cursor scope by looking at the “Options” page of the Database Properties window.

"Default Cursor" scope set at the database level can be verified using the "Options" page of the "Database Properties" window in SSMS

Checking “Default Cursor” scope set at the database level

Reproducing the Problem

For the purposes of this demo, I have created a simple stored procedure in the AdventureWorks database that is called once per each Product Category Id to get the product listing of products in that category.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO

--Create the test stored procedure
IF OBJECT_ID('Production.ProductListing','P') IS NOT NULL
    DROP PROCEDURE Production.ProductListing;
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE Production.ProductListing
    @productCategoryId INT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT ppsc.ProductCategoryID AS ProductCateogry,
           pp.ProductID,
           pp.Name,
           pp.ProductNumber,
           pp.MakeFlag,
           pp.FinishedGoodsFlag,
           pp.StandardCost,
           pp.ListPrice,
           pp.SellEndDate,
           pp.DiscontinuedDate
    FROM Production.Product AS pp
    INNER JOIN Production.ProductSubcategory AS ppsc 
            ON pp.ProductSubcategoryID = ppsc.ProductSubcategoryID
    WHERE ppsc.ProductCategoryID = @productCategoryId;
END
GO

I can now create a cursor, access values from the cursor and call the stored procedure in an iterative manner. One would use this pattern when working with situations where dynamic SQL may need to be used to build the cursor (e.g. when fetching data from different tables of the same structure depending upon the configuration/situation).

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
--Create a CURSOR via Dynamic SQL and then 
--use the values from the CURSOR to call the stored procedure
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO

Normally the stored procedure calls will work just fine, as can be seen from the screenshot below.

Successful execution of cursor when Global cursor scope is configured

Successful execution of cursor when Global cursor scope is configured

Now, let us change the cursor scope to LOCAL at the database level.

--Now, enable local cursors by default
--for the AdventureWorks2012 database
ALTER DATABASE [AdventureWorks2012] SET CURSOR_DEFAULT LOCAL;
GO

Running the same query as above now results in errors! The errors simply state that the cursor with the name “ProductListByCategory” does not exist.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
--Create a CURSOR via Dynamic SQL and then 
--use the values from the CURSOR to call the stored procedure
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO
Msg 16916, Level 16, State 1, Line 75
A cursor with the name 'ProductListByCategory' does not exist.

Learning the hard way

The error message above is exactly what we received after we restored a copy of our development database on a loaned SQL Server instance to facilitate a ramp-up activity.

After conducting an impromptu code review to confirm that there were no other obvious issues (like deallocating the cursor without closing), we set out to compare the server and database settings with a working environment to rule out environmental issues. That’s when we saw that the DBA on the loaned server had changed the cursor scope setting of our database.

The Solution

The ideal solution to this issue has two parts – a configuration piece and a failsafe embedded into standard coding practice.

Set and document database level cursor scope requirements

One part of the ideal solution is to define and document the cursor scope requirements during database design. This should then be part of the documentation and checklists that are referenced when deploying the databases in production.

Database deployment and setup scripts should also have scripts to set the default scope, similar to the one below.

ALTER DATABASE [AdventureWorks2012] SET CURSOR_DEFAULT GLOBAL;
GO

Ensure that cursor scope is defined when declaring a cursor

The fail-safe aspect of the solution is to ensure that when declaring a cursor, the code explicitly specifies whether the cursor is GLOBAL or LOCAL.

As can be seen from the example below, if scope is defined during cursor definition, it continues to work even if the cursor scope at the database level is not as expected.

--Set the cursor scope as GLOBAL when defining the cursor
--(as part of the DECLARE CURSOR statement)
--This overrides the default database configuration
USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR GLOBAL
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO
If the GLOBAL scope is defined when declaring a cursor, the code works as expected even though the database configuration is set to default cursor scope of LOCAL

If the Global scope is defined when declaring a cursor, the code works as expected irrespective of database configuration

Further Reading

The same error message (Msg. 16916) will be thrown due to a simple coding error – when we code deallocates a cursor before closing it first. This can easily be caught by implementing a code review practice and is a lesson for sustenance teams. That is what I recommend as a further reading into this topic.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.