Tag Archives: Guidance

Articles intended to provide guidance to the readers based on my past experiences.

#0402–SQL Server 2016 – KB3207512 fails–Msg 17054 – Unable to shutdown the instance; Operating System Error 21 (The device is not ready)


I recently updated my personal sandbox to use SQL Server 2016. While the installation succeeded, one of the first few problems that I ran into were:

  • The SQL Server 2016 instance failed to shutdown
  • Error 17054 was logged every time a shutdown is attempted with the error: “The current event was not reported to the Windows Events log. Operating system error = (null). You may need to clear the Windows Events log if it is full.
  • Installation of KB3207512 (update for SQL Server 2016 SP1 Reporting Services) and latest CUs kept failing
  • User databases would not be accessible with an error: “The operating system returned error 21(The device is not ready.)

While I was trying to figure out what was wrong, I ran into the same problem with a few other instances.

The Solutions

After a lot of rounds of trial and error, the following changes finally did the trick. The items below collectively make up the solution and all items need to be performed in order to get the SQL server instance up-to speed again.

  • Launch the SQL Server Configuration Manager
  • Under “SQL Server Network Configuration” ensure that the TCP/IP protocol is enabled
  • Under “SQL Server Services”, ensure that the following services are started:
    • SQL Server PolyBase Engine
    • SQL Server PolyBase Data Movement

Once the steps provided above are done, all the problems listed above should cease to exist.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

High-level usage of the File Ordering script task

#0394 – SQL Server – SSIS – ForEach Loop – Controlling processing order


One of the SSIS related questions that I see often in the forums is around the ability to control the sequence in which a For Each Loop processes the files from a directory. When performing data movement as part of an ETL or an integration, it may be required to work asynchronously. The “sender” of the data may place the files in a folder for the data processing to pickup. These files generally contain ordered data that needs to be loaded in a specific sequence.

The problem is that the SSIS For Each Loop container does not have the provision that allows a user to specify the order in which the files are to be processed. Today, I present one of the workarounds that I came up with (there may be others, and I would be very interested to know what do you prefer in these scenarios).

Environment Prep

To demonstrate the ordered loading of files, I created a set of simple files  and a table to which I will be adding the data read from these files.

USE [tempdb];
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.ImportedData','U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    DROP TABLE dbo.ImportedData;
END
GO


CREATE TABLE dbo.ImportedData 
   (RecordId           INT          NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1),
    ProcessedFileName  NVARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    RecordValue        NVARCHAR(100)     NULL,
    ProcessedDate      DATETIME     NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT pk_ImportedData PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (RecordId, ProcessedDate)
   );
GO

To demonstrate the fix, I will not be processing the files in order of their file names, but I will instead be processing them in order of  the date on which they were last saved. The screenshot below shows the order in which files will be processed.

Folder showing files to process in the required non-alphabetical order

Folder showing files to process in the required non-alphabetical order

Core Logic – Identify the Order of the Files to Process

The For Each container is just a mechanism to loop through a set (of objects/files/records). It does not have the provision to control the order in which the set is to be iterated through.

Hence, the workaround that I came up with was to supply a pre-ordered set to the For Each container. I therefore used a script task to order the filenames in a recordset object which I will pass to the For Each container.

As shown below, I pass the path to the folder where the files are located, and accept the sorted list into an object.

High-level usage of the File Ordering script task

High-level usage of the File Ordering script task

The script used within the script task which is also the heart of this solution is provided below.

public void Main()
{
    // TODO: Add your code here
    DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo((string)Dts.Variables["User::FolderPath"].Value);
    List<string> files = new List<string>();

    foreach (var fi in di.EnumerateFiles().OrderBy(t=>t.LastWriteTime))
    {
        files.Add(fi.FullName);
    }

    Dts.Variables["User::FileListing"].Value = files;

    Dts.TaskResult = (int)ScriptResults.Success;
}

Process the File

The  next stage is simply to process the file.

  • The sorted set of files is iterated upon by the For Each container
  • I have a script task that simply prints out a message box with the file being processed currently
  • The data flow task simply reads from the file and writes to a conventional OLE DB destination

Screenshots showing these bits of the configuration are provided below.

0394-sqltwins-ssis-foreachcontainer

For Each Loop Iteration Configuration

0394-sqltwins-ssis-foreachcontainer2

For Each Loop File Name configuration

0394-sqltwins-ssis-dfd_fileconnection

Setting the file connection based on the File Name set by For Each Iterator

If I execute the SSIS package and then query the destination table, we see that the files were indeed ordered in the expected order.

USE [tempdb];
GO
SELECT * 
FROM dbo.ImportedData 
WHERE RecordValue LIKE '%1%';
GO
0394-sqltwins-ssis-output

Output of script to confirm that data was loaded in the required sequence

Further Reading

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

#0388 – SQL Server – SSIS – Lookup transformations are case-sensitive


I have been working with SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) recently. In many ways, SSIS is counter-intuitive if you have been working with the database engine for long (more than a decade in my case). Working with SSIS is more like working with any other .net framework based programming language (C# or VB.net). Over the next couple of days, I will be writing about some of the salient aspects of SSIS which should be kept in mind in case you are working on multiple SQL Server technologies.

Lookup Transformations – A key to successful system integrations

Cross-referencing of Enumerations

One of the key challenges for any system integration is to ensure that the enumerations  and “default” values used in the source system (e.g. sales statuses, product categories, etc) align between the “source” & “target” systems.

Once the values aligned during business, high-level and low-level designs, implementation of this cross-referencing in SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) is done by a data flow component called the “Lookup Transformation“. The Lookup transformation effectively performs a join between the input data with a reference data set. If values match, they are available in what is called the “Match Output” whereas values that do not match can be made available as a “No Match Output”. However, this comes with a tiny counter-intuitive behaviour that I learnt about the hard way.

The lookup performed by the lookup transformation is case-sensitive.

Demo

In order to demonstrate the case-sensitivity of lookup transformations, I have developed a SSIS package that does the following in a simple data-flow task:

  1. Get some static data from an OLEDB data source, basically some rows with text representation of numbers (One, Two, Three, and so on)
  2. The Lookup transform has a static mapping between the numeric and text values of various numbers – 1 through 10
  3. As the input data passes through the lookup transformation, we try to map the text values in the source data with the values available in the lookup transformation so that we can get the appropriate numeric representation
    • In my demo, records that find a valid lookup are written to a recordset destination (it could be any valid destination), whereas records that do not match are written to another destination
    • I have placed data viewers on the output pipelines to visually see the data being moved, which is what I will show below

The query used to generate the static data in the OLE DB source is provided below.

SELECT srcValues.RowName,
       srcValues.RowValue
FROM (VALUES ('Row1','One'),
             ('Row2','Two'),
             ('Row3','three'),
             ('Row4','Four'),
             ('Row5','Five'),
             ('Row6','Six'),
             ('Row7','seven'),
             ('Row8','eight'),
             ('Row9','Nine'),
             ('Row10','Ten')
     ) AS srcValues (RowName, RowValue);

The query used to generate the lookup values for the lookup transform is provided below:

SELECT lookUpValues.Id,
       lookUpValues.RowValue
FROM (VALUES (1, 'One'),
             (2, 'Two'),
             (3, 'Three'),
             (4, 'Four'),
             (5, 'Five'),
             (6, 'Six'),
             (7, 'Seven'),
             (8, 'Eight'),
             (9, 'Nine'),
             (10, 'Ten')
     ) AS lookUpValues (Id, RowValue);

Observe that in the static source data, not all values have a consistent case – some are in sentence case, whereas some are in small case.

The screenshots below show the overall setup of the SSIS package.

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

Data Flow Task used to demonstrate case-sensitivity of Lookup transformation

LookUp Transformation - General configuration (Notice redirection to no match output)

LookUp Transformation – General configuration (Notice redirection to no match output)

Lookup Transformation - Connection tab showing reference values

Lookup Transformation – Connection tab showing reference values

Lookup Transformation - Columns configuration showing "RowValue" used for matching whereas the reference Id is fetched to include in output

Lookup Transformation – Columns configuration

Notice here that we have used the text value from the source data (“RowValue” column) for matching/lookup to the reference data set. The reference Id is fetched to include in output.

If a match is found the “Match Output” should contain the matching row from the source combined with the Id from the reference/lookup data. This is seen in the data viewer output below.

Lookup Transformation - Match Output (source rows with the Id from the reference data)

Lookup Transformation – Match Output (source rows with the Id from the reference data)

If a match is not found (which would be the case for the values with lower case in the source data), the “No Match Output” will contain the row from the source data that failed the lookup (since failures were redirected to the “No Match” output in the general configuration). Notice we do not get the Id from the reference because no match to the reference was found.

Lookup Transformation - No Match Output

Lookup Transformation – No Match Output

Summary

When working with a case insensitive database, we often tend to take data quality with respect to case of the data for granted. Having data with inconsistent case has multiple repercussions (especially with data grouping in front end applications), but the biggest negative impact due to inconsistent case of text data is the inaccurate cross-referencing during a master data cleanup, system integration or data migration exercise.

Call to action

Do take a few cycles in your development to take a look at your data quality, and if necessary, implement required data cleansing to ensure that your lookup data, enumerations and master data are using a case that is correct and consistent with the domain and business requirements.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

"Default Cursor" scope set at the database level can be verified using the "Options" page of the "Database Properties" window in SSMS

#0386 – SQL Server – Cursor Scope – A cursor with the name ‘cursor name’ does not exist.; Msg 16916


It’s a well-known fact that using T-SQL cursors have a significant overhead on the query performance. At the same time, there are applications where one simply cannot use a set-based approach and use T-SQL cursors. Examples of such scenarios are when cascading complex calculations need to happen for each record (which are handled via CLR code or dedicated stored procedures) or when interfacing applications can only accept one record at a time.

Each T-SQL cursor has a specific scope. The cursor can be limited for use within the given stored procedure, trigger or batch making it a LOCAL cursor. If the context of the cursor is to be made available to multiple objects and scopes within the connection until explicitly deallocated, it is a GLOBAL cursor.

The cursor scope (GLOBAL/LOCAL) can be defined at the database level and can be overridden by the DECLARE CURSOR statement. Most implementations that I have seen rely on the database configuration. In such cases, if the cursor has been designed for GLOBAL access and someone changes the database configuration to a LOCAL cursor scope, the code will break.

Checking Default Cursor Scope: Database Configuration

Using T-SQL

A simple check on the [is_local_cursor_default] column of the [sys].[databases] will tell us if the default cursor scope is local or global.

--Confirm that Global cursors are set:
--        is_local_cursor_default = 0, i.e. GLOBAL cursor scope
--        is_local_cursor_default = 1, i.e. LOCAL cursor scope
--This is the default setting!
SELECT [sd].[is_local_cursor_default],
       [sd].* 
FROM [sys].[databases] AS sd 
WHERE [sd].[database_id] = DB_ID('AdventureWorks2012');
GO

As the column name suggests, a value of 0 indicates that the cursor is GLOBAL, whereas a value of 1 indicates that the cursor is LOCAL.

Using SSMS

In SSMS, we can check the value of default cursor scope by looking at the “Options” page of the Database Properties window.

"Default Cursor" scope set at the database level can be verified using the "Options" page of the "Database Properties" window in SSMS

Checking “Default Cursor” scope set at the database level

Reproducing the Problem

For the purposes of this demo, I have created a simple stored procedure in the AdventureWorks database that is called once per each Product Category Id to get the product listing of products in that category.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO

--Create the test stored procedure
IF OBJECT_ID('Production.ProductListing','P') IS NOT NULL
    DROP PROCEDURE Production.ProductListing;
GO
CREATE PROCEDURE Production.ProductListing
    @productCategoryId INT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT ppsc.ProductCategoryID AS ProductCateogry,
           pp.ProductID,
           pp.Name,
           pp.ProductNumber,
           pp.MakeFlag,
           pp.FinishedGoodsFlag,
           pp.StandardCost,
           pp.ListPrice,
           pp.SellEndDate,
           pp.DiscontinuedDate
    FROM Production.Product AS pp
    INNER JOIN Production.ProductSubcategory AS ppsc 
            ON pp.ProductSubcategoryID = ppsc.ProductSubcategoryID
    WHERE ppsc.ProductCategoryID = @productCategoryId;
END
GO

I can now create a cursor, access values from the cursor and call the stored procedure in an iterative manner. One would use this pattern when working with situations where dynamic SQL may need to be used to build the cursor (e.g. when fetching data from different tables of the same structure depending upon the configuration/situation).

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
--Create a CURSOR via Dynamic SQL and then 
--use the values from the CURSOR to call the stored procedure
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO

Normally the stored procedure calls will work just fine, as can be seen from the screenshot below.

Successful execution of cursor when Global cursor scope is configured

Successful execution of cursor when Global cursor scope is configured

Now, let us change the cursor scope to LOCAL at the database level.

--Now, enable local cursors by default
--for the AdventureWorks2012 database
ALTER DATABASE [AdventureWorks2012] SET CURSOR_DEFAULT LOCAL;
GO

Running the same query as above now results in errors! The errors simply state that the cursor with the name “ProductListByCategory” does not exist.

USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
--Create a CURSOR via Dynamic SQL and then 
--use the values from the CURSOR to call the stored procedure
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO
Msg 16916, Level 16, State 1, Line 75
A cursor with the name 'ProductListByCategory' does not exist.

Learning the hard way

The error message above is exactly what we received after we restored a copy of our development database on a loaned SQL Server instance to facilitate a ramp-up activity.

After conducting an impromptu code review to confirm that there were no other obvious issues (like deallocating the cursor without closing), we set out to compare the server and database settings with a working environment to rule out environmental issues. That’s when we saw that the DBA on the loaned server had changed the cursor scope setting of our database.

The Solution

The ideal solution to this issue has two parts – a configuration piece and a failsafe embedded into standard coding practice.

Set and document database level cursor scope requirements

One part of the ideal solution is to define and document the cursor scope requirements during database design. This should then be part of the documentation and checklists that are referenced when deploying the databases in production.

Database deployment and setup scripts should also have scripts to set the default scope, similar to the one below.

ALTER DATABASE [AdventureWorks2012] SET CURSOR_DEFAULT GLOBAL;
GO

Ensure that cursor scope is defined when declaring a cursor

The fail-safe aspect of the solution is to ensure that when declaring a cursor, the code explicitly specifies whether the cursor is GLOBAL or LOCAL.

As can be seen from the example below, if scope is defined during cursor definition, it continues to work even if the cursor scope at the database level is not as expected.

--Set the cursor scope as GLOBAL when defining the cursor
--(as part of the DECLARE CURSOR statement)
--This overrides the default database configuration
USE AdventureWorks2012;
GO
DECLARE @productListCategoryId INT;
EXEC sp_executesql @sql = N'DECLARE ProductListByCategory CURSOR GLOBAL
                                FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY
                            FOR SELECT ppc.ProductCategoryID
                                FROM Production.ProductCategory AS ppc;
                           ';

OPEN ProductListByCategory;

FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS <> -1)
BEGIN
    EXEC Production.ProductListing @productCategoryId = @productListCategoryId;

    FETCH NEXT FROM ProductListByCategory INTO @productListCategoryId;
END

CLOSE ProductListByCategory;
DEALLOCATE ProductListByCategory;
GO
If the GLOBAL scope is defined when declaring a cursor, the code works as expected even though the database configuration is set to default cursor scope of LOCAL

If the Global scope is defined when declaring a cursor, the code works as expected irrespective of database configuration

Further Reading

The same error message (Msg. 16916) will be thrown due to a simple coding error – when we code deallocates a cursor before closing it first. This can easily be caught by implementing a code review practice and is a lesson for sustenance teams. That is what I recommend as a further reading into this topic.

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.

#0385 – SQL Server – Query Development and NULL values


Software Design, Assumptions and their side-effects

A few days ago, I tweeted a news piece that came to my attention on the name “NULL” causing computing systems to malfunction. When I shared it with my colleagues, a healthy discussion on how should software architectures handle NULL took place.

The key focus of discussion was of course that we need to be more globally aware and avoid generalization when defining business requirements (e.g. if one country does not commonly have people with surnames greater than 10 characters in length, doesn’t mean there aren’t people with longer surnames as highlighted here).

We also talked about detection of NULL values and manipulating them. In the world of databases, joins between tables are a common scenario and it is interesting to study the impact that NULL has on the JOIN operator in a T-SQL query.

NULL values and JOINs

I had encountered a scenario involving joining on NULL-able columns which I had encountered during a unit test I was executing. What happened was that rows were disappearing and initially I was unable to figure out why. Allow me to explain with a demo.

I have a simple table with software metrics like lines of code (LoC), story points, etc. for various modules. I also have a look-up table that gives me details of the measurement units, including provision to handle unknown sizing units (which was possible in our case for modules developed in fairly uncommon technologies).

When I joined between the metrics and the sizing units table, what happened was that metrics for the project in uncommon technologies did not appear!

DECLARE @someMetrics TABLE
         (ModuleCode INT         NOT NULL,
          SizeValue  INT             NULL,
          SizeUnit   VARCHAR(10)     NULL
         );

DECLARE @unitMaster TABLE
        (SizeUnit        VARCHAR(10) NULL,
         UnitDescription VARCHAR(50) NULL
        );

INSERT INTO @unitMaster (SizeUnit,
                         UnitDescription
                        )
VALUES (NULL , 'Unit Unknown'),
       ('LOC', 'Lines of Code'),
       ( 'SP', 'Story Points');

INSERT INTO @someMetrics (ModuleCode,
                          SizeValue,
                          SizeUnit
                         )
VALUES (1, 1200, 'LOC'),
       (3, 3, 'SP' ),
       (6, 32, NULL ),
       (7, 2500, 'LOC');

--Problem
SELECT sm.ModuleCode,
       sm.SizeValue,
       um.UnitDescription
FROM @someMetrics AS sm
INNER JOIN @unitMaster AS um ON sm.SizeUnit = um.SizeUnit;
The join operator will eliminate rows with null values in the join predicates

Metrics for NULL sizing units were filtered in the join process

The Root Cause

What is happening is that by default NULL compared with any value (NULL or otherwise) yields NULL. This is expected because when one of two values in a comparison is an unknown, there is no way to ascertain the result of the comparison and hence it has to be unknown, i.e. NULL.

In case of a join, the way SQL Server behaves is that all rows that match a given condition are fetched. Rows with conditions evaluating to “anything other than true” are filtered out. This is exactly what was happening in my case – since the columns used in the joined predicate had NULL values, the comparison yielded NULL (a non-true result) and hence these rows were filtered out.

The Fix

Option 01: The ideal fix is to ensure that the data never contains NULLs. Instead of NULL, a default value (anything suitable to the domain) can be used to indicate that the source system did not supply any value.

Option 02: In case changing the source data is not feasible, the query needs to be updated to substitute the NULL values for a chosen default as shown below.

DECLARE @someMetrics TABLE
         (ModuleCode INT         NOT NULL,
          SizeValue  INT             NULL,
          SizeUnit   VARCHAR(10)     NULL
         );

DECLARE @unitMaster TABLE
        (SizeUnit        VARCHAR(10) NULL,
         UnitDescription VARCHAR(50) NULL
        );

INSERT INTO @unitMaster (SizeUnit,
                         UnitDescription
                        )
VALUES (NULL , 'Unit Unknown'),
       ('LOC', 'Lines of Code'),
       ( 'SP', 'Story Points');

INSERT INTO @someMetrics (ModuleCode,
                          SizeValue,
                          SizeUnit
                         )
VALUES (1, 1200, 'LOC'),
       (3, 3, 'SP' ),
       (6, 32, NULL ),
       (7, 2500, 'LOC');

--One way to resolve the problem
SELECT sm.ModuleCode,
       sm.SizeValue,
       um.UnitDescription
FROM @someMetrics AS sm
INNER JOIN @unitMaster AS um
      ON ISNULL(sm.SizeUnit,'NULL') = ISNULL(um.SizeUnit,'NULL');
Using a chosen default instead of NULL in the join predicate

Using a chosen default instead of NULL in the join predicate

Conclusion

Irrespective of the business design, it is extremely important to have a strategy on handling of NULL values during system design. Most systems lack consistency in the way they allow for and handle NULL values.

Bringing in a set of standardized design practices on handling of NULL values makes it easier to predict system behaviour and also helps in re-engineering efforts whenever required to do so in the future.

Further Reading

  • Why is it not a good idea to implement NOT NULL check as a CHECK constraint? [Blog Link here]
  • SQL Server – CONCAT_NULL_YIELDS_NULL property [Blog Link here]
  • Fun with temporary tables – Impact of ANSI_NULL_DFLT_ON [Blog Link here]

Until we meet next time,

Be courteous. Drive responsibly.